Learning to appreciate light in architecture. Without light, even the most beautiful buildings would be trees falling in empty forests.

9th July 2013

Photo

AMMO Cafe designed by Joyce Wang in Hong Kong.
My thoughts on this - grossly overlit. We have to be careful not to overdo it in lighting design, as illustrated in this image. It’s a cool project and cool concept, but there is so much in here, it’s actually detracting from the overall lighting quality. There is no hierarchy, there is no focal point, it’s just confusing. We have lights in the bar, cove lights at the ceiling, custom spiral staircase pendants, Wall washing at the textured back wall, and a different type of pendant over the perimeter tables. Nothing ties together, and the end result is a lot of visual clutter. 
The hard part to swallow is that most of the elements are really cool and great ideas in and of themselves, but there is no harmony. I will also add that the way the textured wall at the back is lit is tragic. It’s good to notice the good and the bad so we can figure out how to avoid mistakes like this.

AMMO Cafe designed by Joyce Wang in Hong Kong.

My thoughts on this - grossly overlit. We have to be careful not to overdo it in lighting design, as illustrated in this image. It’s a cool project and cool concept, but there is so much in here, it’s actually detracting from the overall lighting quality. There is no hierarchy, there is no focal point, it’s just confusing. We have lights in the bar, cove lights at the ceiling, custom spiral staircase pendants, Wall washing at the textured back wall, and a different type of pendant over the perimeter tables. Nothing ties together, and the end result is a lot of visual clutter. 

The hard part to swallow is that most of the elements are really cool and great ideas in and of themselves, but there is no harmony. I will also add that the way the textured wall at the back is lit is tragic. It’s good to notice the good and the bad so we can figure out how to avoid mistakes like this.

12th April 2011

Photo reblogged from cabbagerose :: architectural inspiration with 105 notes

I am captivated by the way this room plays with human perception. Creates a lovely atmosphere, and I  really like the random pattern of lights on the ceiling, adds to the surreality of it.


cabbagerose:

 
anzas dance studio/tsutsumi and associates
via: dezeen

I am captivated by the way this room plays with human perception. Creates a lovely atmosphere, and I  really like the random pattern of lights on the ceiling, adds to the surreality of it.

cabbagerose:

anzas dance studio/tsutsumi and associates

via: dezeen

17th March 2011

Photo reblogged from cabbagerose :: architectural inspiration with 89 notes

Creative custom luminaires (light fixtures). A fun way to integrate light into the space, but it’s not necessarily an aesthetic I would shoot for - it’s like the place got TP’d… To each his own, but I really do wonder about the inspiration for this.
cabbagerose:

Vivienda 4 Development by A-cero Architects
via: homedsgn

Creative custom luminaires (light fixtures). A fun way to integrate light into the space, but it’s not necessarily an aesthetic I would shoot for - it’s like the place got TP’d… To each his own, but I really do wonder about the inspiration for this.

cabbagerose:

Vivienda 4 Development by A-cero Architects

via: homedsgn

13th March 2011

Photo

University of Bogota by Daniel Bonilla Arquitectos - What I love about this is the playful use of daylight to create patterns on the walls and floors that change with the time of day. Another fantastic idea is “floating” the benches by illuminating them from beneath. It fills the space with light, bringing a cheerful and fun atmosphere.

University of Bogota by Daniel Bonilla Arquitectos - What I love about this is the playful use of daylight to create patterns on the walls and floors that change with the time of day. Another fantastic idea is “floating” the benches by illuminating them from beneath. It fills the space with light, bringing a cheerful and fun atmosphere.

10th March 2011

Photo reblogged from Between The Ears with 15 notes

Using light to create art - but this time using how light creates shadows. I think it would be so fun to have the time to do something like this!! Props to Kumi Yamashita, the artist.


between-the-ears:

Design Blog :: SPGRA | Fascinating Shadow Art by Kumi YAMASHITA

Using light to create art - but this time using how light creates shadows. I think it would be so fun to have the time to do something like this!! Props to Kumi Yamashita, the artist.

between-the-ears:

Design Blog :: SPGRA | Fascinating Shadow Art by Kumi YAMASHITA

Tagged: lightingdesign

2nd March 2011

Photo reblogged from cabbagerose :: architectural inspiration with 407 notes

This fascinates me. Light interacts with surfaces in so many unexpected ways, it truly is an art form to be able to harness that potential in architectural settings. This could have been just another elevator, instead it’s transformed by playful light art.
This is in a luxury residence in NY, One Jackson Square. I believe the lighting credits can go to WSP Flack & Kurtz…

This fascinates me. Light interacts with surfaces in so many unexpected ways, it truly is an art form to be able to harness that potential in architectural settings. This could have been just another elevator, instead it’s transformed by playful light art.

This is in a luxury residence in NY, One Jackson Square. I believe the lighting credits can go to WSP Flack & Kurtz…

Source: ummhello

25th February 2011

Photo reblogged from cabbagerose :: architectural inspiration with 185 notes

The Guangzhou Opera House, Guangdong Province, China - Zaha Hadid Architects

 The use of light in this space is astounding. Talk about luxury! This opera house designed by the iconic Zaha Hadid Architects gave the lighting designers quite a lovely palette to work with. The lighting consultant, Beijing Light and View, went above and beyond with their understanding of the way light would play off the smooth surfaces. They were able to highlight the expansiveness of the hall by lighting the undersides of the terraces. What really jumps out is that playful use of sparkle. It’s like you’re looking up at a sky full of bright stars. Love it.

The Guangzhou Opera House, Guangdong Province, China - Zaha Hadid Architects

The use of light in this space is astounding. Talk about luxury! This opera house designed by the iconic Zaha Hadid Architects gave the lighting designers quite a lovely palette to work with. The lighting consultant, Beijing Light and View, went above and beyond with their understanding of the way light would play off the smooth surfaces. They were able to highlight the expansiveness of the hall by lighting the undersides of the terraces. What really jumps out is that playful use of sparkle. It’s like you’re looking up at a sky full of bright stars. Love it.

Tagged: lightdesignilluminationlightingarchitecturezaha hadid

4th January 2011

Post

Love is blind, or at least a little fuzzy - from an engineering standpoint.

Long has the phrase “Love is blind” been thrown around to explain odd couples, ugly pets, and internet chat rooms. The origins of the phrase date back to who else but good old Bill Shakespeare. Little did he know how incredibly correct he was.

  Well, someone loves him as evidenced by the hearts on his collar…

A 2004 study at the University College London showed that a person’s ability to judge and think critically is hindered when concerning someone they are very close to. The brain decides it is not important to negatively judge the loved one’s personal qualities, including appearance and personality. This applies also to maternal feelings, giving weight to having “a face that only a mother could love.”

Beyond this point, and more related to what I’m interested in, is the consequences of love on human vision. It has been shown that love causes the pupils to dilate. This dilation is viewed as attractive.

 The experienced pouter can dilate on demand.

So love makes your pupils dilate, cool. The thing is, that the eye works very much like a camera, and those of you who work with cameras know that as you decrease the size of the aperture, more of the image is in focus. The very same goes for vision: in essence, visual acuity is increased as the pupil gets smaller.

Though it may technically only be a very slight difference, that fact is that the imperfections of someone you love are more difficult to see. And this occurs even before the image reaches your brain for processing.